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Using “Dibs” to clear Chronic Pain

There is a wintertime ritual that takes place each winter in my hometown of Chicago. When snow arrives in large amounts, folks spend valuable time and energy shoveling out a place to park their car. There is an unspoken rule that no one else can occupy that space. To ensure this, when someone must vacate their spot to go to work, they place random objects in their spot. This is called “dibs.” Ironing boards, lava lamps, lawn chairs and other things you’d place in a yard sale are all considered fair markers indicating, “this space is occupied.” CAM00498

I have worked for many years to excavate pain from the interior places in my body. It has taken hard conscious efforts to employ several pain management techniques. Meditation, stress management, life style modifications, Reiki, and narrative therapy are some of the tools I have employed.

When I travel back home and see folks engage in “dibs,” I am reminded that I need to continually guard my pain-free spaces. Not exercising, not eating right, overdoing and not making healthy decisions allow pain to penetrate my cleared space and knock down my “dibs.” When this happens, when my “dibs” space is invaded, I am capable of becoming as violent as I have seen others become when someone dares to move their stuff from an unofficially marked parking space.

To those of you have spent time or are in the process of clearing pain from your body, be sure to check your “dibs” and make sure the cherished space that has been emptied does not get reinvaded. And make sure you have strong dibs. Weak dibs, like yellow construction tape, is not effective enough to keep pain from trespassing.

Passionately claim your healed space and long live “dibs.”

If you’re looking for a good laugh, which is a great pain-management technique, check out the Chicago Dibs tumblr. 

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About Mary Byrne Eigel

Before writing children’s books, Mary spent many years teaching in classrooms and creating art in her studio. She was born with bi-lateral hip dysplasia, a painful condition that causes normal activities, like walking, to be challenging. As a child, when Mary had to trek long distances, she often wished she had a wheelchair. For her, a wheelchair offered pain-free opportunities, not limitations. Mary grew up in Chicago, which is the lakefront inspiration for the town of Sail. She lives in Missouri with her husband and two dogs, Beaux and Trey.

2 responses »

  1. Love this Mary! Calling Dibs! Unlike the city, that just picked up all dibs last week in Chicago , I can keep mine in place!

  2. Mary Byrne Eigel

    See, you have to keep an eye out. Forces are all to eager to invade our boundaries. Stay vigilant!

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